Busy Writing a Book

Happy 2023 everyone!  You’ve noticed, no doubt, that the blog has been quiet recently.  That’s because I’ve got a book contract, with a deadline of March 31, 2023.  [The book itself won’t be published til spring 2024.]  I’ll tell you more about this in future posts. But over the next couple of months I’ll be a bit slow to answer questions and even slower to write content.  Fortunately, much of the content on this website is still current — the universe seems to be much the same in 2023 as it was in 2011 when the site was born. So poke around; I’m sure you’ll find something that interests you!

13 thoughts on “Busy Writing a Book”

  1. Sold. Just tell me when it available. I always thought that a graphical tv kind of thing that explained some of the concepts on this website would be groundbreaking.

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  2. Wishing you well with the writing. Jeffrey Archer is a successful fictional UK author who gave details on how he wrote his first successful book and unsurprisingly: focused, organized, consistency everyday with continuous critical feedback from an editor/critic seems to be the key. An example of the gold standard in popular science writing for me is Frank Close’s The Infinity Puzzle: Quantum Field Theory and the Hunt for an Orderly Universe; but perhaps too ambitious and expensive for what your publisher wants?

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  3. Hi professor. I hope you finish and introduce us to your new book. But, please, with your big intelligence, yes, I said intelligence, because I ask you how is possible the Artificial Intelligence’s chatGPT site can answer every thing automatically to you about everything about Physics an other subjects, but instantly, that no humans can type so quickly. Is there a fake on it? Thanks.

    https://openai.com/blog/chatgpt/

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    • Intelligence is not the same as knowledge; indeed, in my experience, many of my readers, though in some cases uninformed about physics, are of high intelligence. I am simply not knowledgeable about chatGPT’s inner workings and have nothing smart to say about it. But it’s not magic (and it’s not fake) so your questions have answers. If I learn something I’ll let you know. I haven’t used it yet (it’s often too busy.)

      Reply
  4. Good luck with your book, Dr. Strassler. I read your blog with little to say because I am not a physicist. I have learned a great deal from you. By this, I do not mean raw facts as much as I do the temperament with which you approach your craft.

    Thank you for that.

    Reply

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